Home » Medieval Crete: Byzantine Crete, Venetian Crete, Nikephoros Ii, George of Trebizond, Cretan War, Sfakians, Demetrios Kydones, Byzantine Lyra by Books LLC
Medieval Crete: Byzantine Crete, Venetian Crete, Nikephoros Ii, George of Trebizond, Cretan War, Sfakians, Demetrios Kydones, Byzantine Lyra Books LLC

Medieval Crete: Byzantine Crete, Venetian Crete, Nikephoros Ii, George of Trebizond, Cretan War, Sfakians, Demetrios Kydones, Byzantine Lyra

Books LLC

Published August 30th 2011
ISBN : 9781158143511
Paperback
82 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 31. Chapters: Byzantine Crete, Venetian Crete, Nikephoros II Phokas, George of Trebizond, Cretan War, Sfakians,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 31. Chapters: Byzantine Crete, Venetian Crete, Nikephoros II Phokas, George of Trebizond, Cretan War, Sfakians, Emirate of Crete, Demetrios Kydones, 365 Crete earthquake, Byzantine lyra, Revolt of St. Titus, Cyril Lucaris, Siege of Candia, Saint Nikon the Metanoeite, 1303 Crete earthquake, Kingdom of Candia, Pietro Gradenigo, Abu Hafs, Gregory of Sinai, Maximos Margunios, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Collection of Chania. Excerpt: The Cretan War (Greek: ) or War of Candia (Italian: ), as the Fifth Ottoman-Venetian War is better known, was a conflict between the Republic of Venice and her allies (chief among them the Knights of Malta, the Papal States and France) against the Ottoman Empire and the Barbary States, fought over the island of Crete, Venices largest and richest overseas possession. The war lasted from 1645 to 1669 and was fought in Crete and in numerous naval engagements and raids around the Aegean Sea, with Dalmatia providing a secondary theater of operations. Although most of Crete was conquered by the Ottomans in the first few years of the war, the fortress of Candia (modern Heraklion), the capital of Crete, resisted successfully. Its prolonged siege, Troys rival as Lord Byron called it, forced both sides to focus their attention on the supply of their respective forces on the island. For the Venetians in particular, their only hope for victory over the larger Ottoman army in Crete lay in successfully starving it of supplies and reinforcements. Hence the war turned into a series of naval encounters between the two navies and their allies. Venice was aided by various Western European nations, who, exhorted by the Pope and in a revival of crusading spirit, sent men, ships and supplies to defend Christendom. Throughout the war, Venice maintained overall naval superiority, winning most naval engagements, but the e...